AGU19 Session: Multi-scale controls on soil organic matter: leveraging networks, synthesis, and long-term studies

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Start Date: 
Tuesday, July 16, 2019 - 09:00 to Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 09:00

Dear CZO Colleague, Please consider submitting an abstract to AGU Biogeosciences Session B080 - Multi-scale controls on soil organic matter: leveraging networks, synthesis, and long-term studies. Networks can play a unique and important role in catalyzing breakthroughs in understanding and predicting SOM dynamics. For this session, we would like to hear about your work investigating controls on soil organic matter using a networked, multi-site approach, long-term observations or experiments, or involving collaboration between empiricists and modelers within and across networks and scales.

The submission deadline is Wednesday, July 31. Contribute your abstract via the AGU Fall Meeting website: https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/77676

See you in San Francisco!

  • Samantha Weintraub (Battelle - NEON)
  • Will Wieder (NCAR)
  • Leo Flores (Boise State)
  • Kate Lajtha (Oregon State)

Session Title: B080 - Multi-scale controls on soil organic matter: leveraging networks, synthesis, and long-term studies

Session Description: Soil organic matter (SOM) is a critical ecosystem variable regulated by complex physical, chemical and biological interactions across scales. Better constraints on SOM pools and fluxes are required to advance understanding and generate insight into how global change will influence SOM persistence and vulnerability. Interdisciplinary research and observation networks are collecting long term, geographically distributed data that can help elucidate mechanisms driving soil organic matter dynamics, and international efforts are working toward soil data harmonization and data-model sharing. We seek contributions investigating controls on soil organic matter using a networked, multi-site approach and/or leveraging long-term observations or experiments. Studies using novel tools, from microbial -omics to near-surface geophysical and remote sensing observations, are welcome. Contributions that discuss data dissemination, cross-site synthesis, and collaborations between empiricists and modelers within and across networks, are strongly encouraged.

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