Special Issue of ESPL on Landscape Evolution from a Critical Zone Science Perspective

Article Type: 
Start Date: 
Thursday, January 7, 2016 - 17:30

Dear Colleagues,

We recently convened a session at the 2015 annual AGU meeting on Landscape evolution from a Critical Zone Science Perspective (see below for a description of the topic).  We are now assessing whether there is interest from the community to put together a Virtual Themed Issue of Earth Surface Processes and Landforms on this same topic.  We welcome interest from all parties, regardless of whether they were able to participate in our AGU session. We will likely make the submission deadline some time in late summer 2016.  Please let us know by Monday Feb 1, 2016 if you might be interested in submitting work on this topic to such an effort.

About an ESPL Virtual Themed Issue:

A Virtual Themed Issue is a collection of already published papers on a similar topic.  Each paper is handled separately and published when ready. Once all of the papers that are routed towards the themed issue are published, they are then grouped together in the Virtual Themed Issue.  Most importantly, there is no delay in getting your paper published even if other papers for the same themed issue need more time than your paper to become polished.  Your work is published in a timely fashion and will have extra visibility through the Virtual Themed Issue.  (See http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)10969837/homepage/virtual_themed_and_special_issues.htm)

Description of Topic:

Critical zone science emphasizes connections and interactions among physical, chemical and biological systems from the top of the vegetation canopy to weathered bedrock.  Geomorphologic processes seen through this perspective are influenced by spatial and temporal gradients in ecology, climate, hydrology, weathering, soils, geology and tectonics.  This session highlights research examining how these interconnected processes are integrated over long timescales to shape landscapes.  Studies focused in the network of critical zone observatories and beyond are welcomed as are numerical or conceptual models investigating landscape evolution from an integrated systems perspective.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Best,

Alison Anders, Nikki West and Nicole Gasparini (ngaspari@tulane.edu)

Comments

Dear Colleagues,

We recently convened a session at the 2015 annual AGU meeting on Landscape evolution from a Critical Zone Science Perspective (see below for a description of the topic).  We are now assessing whether there is interest from the community to put together a Virtual Themed Issue of Earth Surface Processes and Landforms on this same topic.  We welcome interest from all parties, regardless of whether they were able to participate in our AGU session. We will likely make the submission deadline some time in late summer 2016.  Please let us know by Monday Feb 1, 2016 if you might be interested in submitting work on this topic to such an effort.

About an ESPL Virtual Themed Issue:

A Virtual Themed Issue is a collection of already published papers on a similar topic.  Each paper is handled separately and published when ready. Once all of the papers that are routed towards the themed issue are published, they are then grouped together in the Virtual Themed Issue.  Most importantly, there is no delay in getting your paper published even if other papers for the same themed issue need more time than your paper to become polished.  Your work is published in a timely fashion and will have extra visibility through the Virtual Themed Issue.  (See http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)10969837/homepage/virtual_themed_and_special_issues.htm)

Description of Topic:

Critical zone science emphasizes connections and interactions among physical, chemical and biological systems from the top of the vegetation canopy to weathered bedrock.  Geomorphologic processes seen through this perspective are influenced by spatial and temporal gradients in ecology, climate, hydrology, weathering, soils, geology and tectonics.  This session highlights research examining how these interconnected processes are integrated over long timescales to shape landscapes.  Studies focused in the network of critical zone observatories and beyond are welcomed as are numerical or conceptual models investigating landscape evolution from an integrated systems perspective.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Best,

Alison Anders, Nikki West and Nicole Gasparini (ngaspari@tulane.edu)