H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest

Location

44° 11' 54.9996" N, 122° 14' 40.9992" W
Brief Site Description: 
Cool temperate forest
Detailed Site Description: 

Landuse:  forestry; ecoregion:  cool temperate; Slope (%): 5 - 10 %

Data available - soil solid:  OC, N and bulk density; soil water:  DOC; soil gas: surface flux; vegetation:  above ground biomass

Habitat - Temperate coniferous forest—douglas-fir, western hemlock, western red cedar, true fir and mountain hemlock, streams.

Soils - Soils are primarily Inceptisols, with local areas of Alfisols and  Spodosols derived from mainly andesite volcanic bedrock. Surface  horizons are commonly loamy but may be stony at depth and  shallow on steep slopes.

Research - How do land use (mainly forestry and roads), natural disturbances  (mainly fire and floods), and climate change affect three key  ecosystem properties: carbon dynamics, biodiversity, and hydrology? Established in 1948

Low elevations: Oligocene-lower Miocene  volcanic rocks composed of mudflow,  ash flow, and stream deposits. higher elevations:  Miocene andesite lava flows

Maritime: wet, mild winters and dry, cool  summers annual mean temp:  8.5c    annual mean precip:  2200 mm/year

AAP = 2,500 mm at low elevations, falling mainly as rain at low  elevations and as snow at upper elevations.

Facilities - headquarter facilities include office, laboratory, and living facilities.

Field Site Type: 
US affiliate
Registration: 
Unregistered
Network(s): 
LTER
LTSE
USFS
Geology: 
other sedimentary
other igneous
Soil Order: 
Alfisol
Inceptisol
Spodosol
Average Winter Temperature: 
1°C
Study Start Date: 
Thursday, January 1, 1948 - 00:00
Mean Annual Precipitation: 
2 200millimeters / year
Average Annual Temperature: 
9°C
Average Summer Temperature: 
18°C
Hydrology: Name: 
Lookout Creek
Hydrology: Surface water stream order: 
Third Order
Hydrology: Surface water - Stream Flow Performance: 
Perennial
Hydrology: Groundwater: 
Unknown
Land Cover: 
Developed- Low
Evergreen Forest
Climate: 
Temperate
Sub-Climate: 
Hyperhumid